Review: Tapestry Plans and Ploys – new forces upset the balance

There was peace. Everyone found territory with which they were satisfied and nothing forced us to continue fighting and arguing for a piece of land. We each developed and improved the quality of our lives in peace, but then one day the first warning came suddenly. An army with a flag we had never seen before appeared on the horizon. And we knew peace was gone. Again, we will have to work harder to be the ones to survive.

New competition and with it new challenges came into the game with a brand new expansion called . The extension was prepared by the original game designer . Illustrations for new card additions were created by . The game was released under the logo in the fall of .

The extension is hidden in a small box, from which a patrol in a balloon peeks out at the modern city. This is exactly what players would definitely like to build for their civilization as well. And the novelty will allow them to do so. Inside are a number of cards, but also some pieces and a few small chips. But before we talk about what it’s for, let’s first remember how Tapestry is played.

In the game, each player becomes one civilization, whose card he chooses at the beginning and thus also acquires a special skill. In addition, depending on the chosen color, he will also receive columns for the fight for dominance over the world map. Everyone has their regular income from their welfare card, where they have building pieces. Not only finances, but also accumulated resources, players immediately spend to advance with their indicator on one of the four progress scales. In this way, they will receive a reward that will move their civilization further, for example by discovering a box on the map, gaining a special building (from which they try to form columns and rows on their city card) or cards. Everyone improves their nation in four different areas and thus, in addition to success, also gains victory points.

The basis of the novelty is a dozen civilizations that are unique and completely different. There are, for example, treasure hunters (they focus on the map and positional combat on it) or intruders and their pieces from space. In general, many newcomers revolve around the map, but each is really interesting. All rules require long texts on the card, but give players new options. And above all, they increase the variability of the overall impression.

The main attraction, however, is probably to be the cards of important buildings (landmark). Each player receives one card with such a building in his hand at the beginning of the game, and his task is to meet its requirements at any time and thus obtain this specific structure. Just five new pieces are designed for these cards and will decorate the cities of players as soon as they can build them.

However, the requirements of these new cards are quite simple to meet, which is a shame, because it is not a bigger challenge for players. So it’s more about timing the addition of a new building to the city.

The penultimate novelty is represented by space pieces, which offer an extension of the plan in the middle of a common game plan. And the last seventh building is connected to this space area – the monolith. Its owner will get the opportunity to earn more victory points.

Fifteen new tapestry title cards will also be added to the game. These players unload in the game, and the new additions again serve to increase variability and add new ways for players to earn some additional income. But instead, they can also be played during the conquest action, when players can attack each other. This gets more conflicts into the game, but they get lost in the number of cards and peek out only from time to time.

In addition, one tapestry is connected to the new building and therefore represents a new way to enrich its capital with the construction of a stadium. This is an interesting novelty and change, which will only show up once in a long time.

This generally applies to the entire new Tapestry: Plans and Ploys box. The news is nice, but neither is crucial. It’s a bunch of a few small improvements that will definitely please you, but they certainly don’t have a chance to change the overall impression or experience in any way. Tapestry: Plans and Ploys will therefore be intended mainly for those avid fans of the original game.

DesignerJamey Stegmaier
ArtistAndrew Bosley, Rom Brown
PublisherStonemaier Games, 999 Games, Feuerland Spiele, Maldito Games, Matagot
Year Published2020
# of Players1 - 5
User Suggested # of Players Best with 4 players
Recommended with 1, 2, 3, 4 players
(9 voters)
Playing Time120
Mfg Suggested Ages12 and up
User Suggested Ages10 and up
(2 voters)
Language DependenceSome necessary text - easily memorized or small crib sheet
(2 voters)
CategoryExpansion for Base-game, Civilization
MechanicDice Rolling, Hand Management, Hexagon Grid, Solo / Solitaire Game, Tech Trees / Tech Tracks, Tile Placement, Variable Player Powers
ExpansionTapestry
Primary NameTapestry: Plans and Ploys
Alternate NamesTapestry: Manœuvres et Manigances, Tapestry: Pläne und Gegenpläne, Tapestry: Planes y Complots, Tapestry: Plannen en Complotten

Infos courtesy of boardgamegeek.com. More Infos.

Review: Tapestry Plans and Ploys – new forces upset the balance
Final word
Tapestry: Plans and Ploys is an extension of a great game, and it is never easy to enrich it significantly. And that's exactly what happened here. The author decided to go the way of small improvements, which are not very visible in the overall view. Variability is always welcome and more cards as well, but don't expect any twists and turns from this expansion. The expansion of Tapestry: Plans and Ploys is about trivia and as such will please especially frequent Tapestry players, who will notice the inconspicuous modifications.
Reader Rating0 Votes
Pros
+ seven new buildings
+ interesting civilizations
+ a new way to profit from some buildings
+ secret landmark cards
+ conflict tapestry cards
Cons
= news does not change the impression of the game
= news appear too rarely in the game
4
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